Tag Archives: business

From the Archives: 4 Critical Social Media Lessons I Learned From My 4 Year Old

My son just turned 4 and has developed into a kind and considerate little man. Before you say “of course, he is your son, brag much?”, let me support my theory with a bit of fact.  The truth is, I am learning from him. I marvel at what we can learn about connecting on the social web from this little man …

Thank you is just the beginning of the relationship

On his birthday, we had a party for all his friends at a gymnastics place where the kids could bounce around and burn some energy. After the party, not only did he actually thank each friend for coming and for each present, he could recall who got him what afterwards! The staff at the gymnastics joint commented on his awesome manners. A proud Mommy moment and even more proud the weeks following when my son still remembered what each of his friends gave him.

In social it is so easy to show gratitude but often can be time consuming when you have many followers/fans/comments. However, a little “Thank you” goes a long way!

Thank people for sharing in a Tweet, Re-Tweet something that resonates with you, or share a blog post that your followers would enjoy. Pay it forward, be a resource for others and support those around you. Also, know it does not have to stop at “Thank you.”  There have been countless times my son and I have been going into school or a store and someone has held the door open for us. My son politely says (on his own) “Thank you” and then asks me, “Mommy why didn’t they say You’re welcome?”

“Thank you” is just the beginning of a relationship. The doors of communication are now open and you have endless possibilities of what you can do with the relationship.

Stay centered

big hairMy son has the most beautiful long blonde hair, and he loves it! He allows me to trim it but he really wants to have long hair. This is a part of him.

l recently took my son to McDonald’s to romp in the play area (He absolutely thinks this is THE most fun ever). The last two times we went to McD’s he comes up to me with a new friend (once it was a girl the other time a boy) and says, ” Mommy tell him/her I’m a boy!”(because of his hair). No matter how many times he has a “prove your gender” altercation or is called a girl at his own birthday party (yes this did actually happen), it does not phase him. He likes what he likes, and that is it.

Whether you are a person, a business or a brand on the social web, you’re going to get knocked around a bit. But you must represent yourself in one true, consistent voice. You can’t be something you are not. Stay centered.

Patience Pays

My family had been looking forward to the State Fair of Texas all year. My son has big dreams about it and was sure he could ride all the big rides now. After all,  he was 4!

Big TexRealistically, he was just one inch taller than last year, so we were still very limited in what he could enjoy at the fair. This did not phase him at all. He went, he saw, he conquered the same three fun houses and four rides. All day.

He patiently waited all year for the fair, patiently waited to park, patiently waited in many lines to eat, drink, ride rides, and play games.  And then, it was all over in 8 hours.

In social, success rarely happens over night. You must nurture the relationships you make, consistently deliver valuable content, and engage with others in an authentic way. Most of the time, you have to wait to ride the big rides.

Just as it takes time to build a valuable brand, it takes time to build a good social following. Simply opening accounts serves little or no purpose. Don’t give up after one month and you have only 15 followers on Twitter and no one has read your blog post. Just think of the possibilities: communities to be part of, businesses you can work with, folks to connect with, and all of the knowledge that goes along with it.

The Wonder of Learning

Each day my little dude learns at least two new things. How wonderful is that? Life is constantly exciting for him because the world is a wonder.

How can you capture this spirit in your own life? Are you spending time to learn and wonder?

Make it a point in your life to try to always be learning. Social make this so easy. You have a world full of folks on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and G+ willing to connect with you and share new content and ideas.  Many of these connections can be instrumental to you personally and professionally and likewise, you can be very instrumental to them. It can be a very mutually beneficial on various levels.  You must first listen, then engage and take part in the conversation. Identify mentors and learn from them.

This post was not meant to be a page in my Mommy Brag Book. But, when thinking of some of the basics of social, they really do relate back to the basics of a happy life. Keep things in perspective. Be genuine. Be the person you want to meet. And be sure to take the rocks out of your pockets before starting the laundry!

What are you learning from your kids and how is relating to your business?

via Four critical Social Media Lessons I learned from my 4 year old – Schaefer Marketing Solutions: We Help Businesses {grow}

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Everyone is a Marketer

Since 2009 I have been fortunate enough to encounter thousands of undergraduate and graduate business students at two different universities during those years. Whether it be the sophomore or junior taking their first Marketing course, or the graduate student pursuing a masters in marketing with an undergraduate degree in another discipline – I always come across at least one student per term that is fearful and nervous about the course because they have “no experience in marketing“. Typically, this same student refers to simply advertising and commercials in our first class discussions. Not knowing, that those are only but two elements of a discipline that transcends …..

Everyone is a Marketer

A key idea I like to present to my students in the beginning of the term is for them to not think of themselves as marketing novices. I ask them to look at themselves, as consumers. I ask them to consider why they made purchases, why they chose one brand over another, how they prioritized purchases etc. Then, I ask them to take those details and consider ways marketing may have played a roll. This often opens many eyes. Then, I will also ask student to think of themselves as a product, and ask them ways that they could address the 4 P’s (or 7 P’s). Students begin to think from a different perspective. I tell my students, ” YOU are the most important product you will ever market. Brand it accordingly“. Often this self reflection makes many elements of marketing more applicable…..Because everyone is a marketer.

The Narrative
Students know more about Marketing than they realize, they simply need a tour guide to provide the narrative. In this age of push and pull marketing, consumers are marketed to in a variety of ways throughout each day. Marketing is everywhere, even if it is a bit incognito. As part of this narrative, instructors like myself seek textbooks and resources to not only support our lectures and teachings, but to also help show application and relevance. As part of this quest for useful learning resources has evolved, so has the output from publishers. I was lucky enough to review Hunt and Mello’s Marketing some time ago when the 1st edition was being developed. The undergraduate level book presented a novel approach of “everyone is a marketer” that grabbed my attention. Now, the anticipated second edition will be hitting the shelves.

Social Media Marketing
A majority of the courses that I have taught since 2009 are Social Media Marketing courses, my doctoral research centers around Social Media Marketing. So, when I see college level text books devoting one chapter to social, I cringe. I would prefer to supplement the resources with proven business books on the facets of social. However, for an undergrad Marketing course, that is not feasible. Students need a book that not only covers the basic principles of marketing, but also includes the elements of social media marketing into the mix. Just as social media should not operate in a silo in business, it should not be thought of as a stand alone topic – it should be interwoven throughout an introductory marketing book.

So, naturally I was intrigued by Shane Hunt, John Mello, and George Deitz’s approach to Marketing. As I further reviewed the content, I was delighted with the approach they took for the text. The second edition now includes chapters on retailing, personal selling, and digital/social media; while still doing a great job helping students apply marketing to their own career and career search. For example there is a Personal Marketing Plan section woven through the text, where students have the opportunity to really reflect on themselves, their career, and aspirations as the focus of a Marketing Plan. Through a variety of methods, the authors help make the content relevant whatever student career paths may be:

1. Executive Perspective
I really like the ‘Executive Perspective’ added to each chapter. This section features successful professionals who did not major in Marketing, yet use the principles of marketing every day. This addition helps bring concepts and topics to life by showing them in action, in a business environment, by someone in the field.

2. Today’s Professional Perspective
Another great addition to the content is a section (much like the above) in each chapter that highlights a recent graduate addressing the various areas of marketing that a student may find employment in. Again providing students with information that is relevant and timely.

3. Interactive
The text includes an interactive feature called Connect. Assignments help students understand and apply concepts covered in the chapters. For example, you can assign textbook readings with SmartBook, and for each chapter there are auto-graded analytics exercises. Not to mention, students have access to the eBook and study tools geared toward their own personal knowledge gaps (based on their interactions with the adaptive learning of SmartBook). This is a great display of content meshed well with technology.

4. Ethical and Global Elements
As opposed to devoting one chapter to Ethics and Globalization, they are woven through the text as a section in each chapter. Students are presented with cases that relate to the chapter topics. which helps give them a more robust view of marketing.

5. Social Media Application
Again, this was a key feature of the text for me. While they offer a chapter on Digital/ Social Media Marketing, there is also the opportunity for student to explore application within a Social Media Application section in each chapter as it relates to specific chapter topics. This is a great way to relate basic principles of marketing to social media as a tool for marketers.


The Chapter Challenge
How does your undergrad text measure up? You can take The Chapter Challenge here. Why am I suggesting you do this?.. Well, for every Challenge completed, McGraw-Hill will make a donation to the American Marketing Association’s Diversity Leadership and Social Impact scholarships. The Chapter Challenge takes about half an hour to complete and invites you to compare Shane Hunt, John Mello, and George Deitz’s Marketing, 2nd edition with your current Marketing Principles course materials.

Take the Challenge and feel free to comment below!


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