Category Archives: Higher Ed/ Student Life

Everyone is a Marketer

Since 2009 I have been fortunate enough to encounter thousands of undergraduate and graduate business students at two different universities during those years. Whether it be the sophomore or junior taking their first Marketing course, or the graduate student pursuing a masters in marketing with an undergraduate degree in another discipline – I always come across at least one student per term that is fearful and nervous about the course because they have “no experience in marketing“. Typically, this same student refers to simply advertising and commercials in our first class discussions. Not knowing, that those are only but two elements of a discipline that transcends …..

Everyone is a Marketer

A key idea I like to present to my students in the beginning of the term is for them to not think of themselves as marketing novices. I ask them to look at themselves, as consumers. I ask them to consider why they made purchases, why they chose one brand over another, how they prioritized purchases etc. Then, I ask them to take those details and consider ways marketing may have played a roll. This often opens many eyes. Then, I will also ask student to think of themselves as a product, and ask them ways that they could address the 4 P’s (or 7 P’s). Students begin to think from a different perspective. I tell my students, ” YOU are the most important product you will ever market. Brand it accordingly“. Often this self reflection makes many elements of marketing more applicable…..Because everyone is a marketer.

The Narrative
Students know more about Marketing than they realize, they simply need a tour guide to provide the narrative. In this age of push and pull marketing, consumers are marketed to in a variety of ways throughout each day. Marketing is everywhere, even if it is a bit incognito. As part of this narrative, instructors like myself seek textbooks and resources to not only support our lectures and teachings, but to also help show application and relevance. As part of this quest for useful learning resources has evolved, so has the output from publishers. I was lucky enough to review Hunt and Mello’s Marketing some time ago when the 1st edition was being developed. The undergraduate level book presented a novel approach of “everyone is a marketer” that grabbed my attention. Now, the anticipated second edition will be hitting the shelves.

Social Media Marketing
A majority of the courses that I have taught since 2009 are Social Media Marketing courses, my doctoral research centers around Social Media Marketing. So, when I see college level text books devoting one chapter to social, I cringe. I would prefer to supplement the resources with proven business books on the facets of social. However, for an undergrad Marketing course, that is not feasible. Students need a book that not only covers the basic principles of marketing, but also includes the elements of social media marketing into the mix. Just as social media should not operate in a silo in business, it should not be thought of as a stand alone topic – it should be interwoven throughout an introductory marketing book.

So, naturally I was intrigued by Shane Hunt, John Mello, and George Deitz’s approach to Marketing. As I further reviewed the content, I was delighted with the approach they took for the text. The second edition now includes chapters on retailing, personal selling, and digital/social media; while still doing a great job helping students apply marketing to their own career and career search. For example there is a Personal Marketing Plan section woven through the text, where students have the opportunity to really reflect on themselves, their career, and aspirations as the focus of a Marketing Plan. Through a variety of methods, the authors help make the content relevant whatever student career paths may be:

1. Executive Perspective
I really like the ‘Executive Perspective’ added to each chapter. This section features successful professionals who did not major in Marketing, yet use the principles of marketing every day. This addition helps bring concepts and topics to life by showing them in action, in a business environment, by someone in the field.

2. Today’s Professional Perspective
Another great addition to the content is a section (much like the above) in each chapter that highlights a recent graduate addressing the various areas of marketing that a student may find employment in. Again providing students with information that is relevant and timely.

3. Interactive
The text includes an interactive feature called Connect. Assignments help students understand and apply concepts covered in the chapters. For example, you can assign textbook readings with SmartBook, and for each chapter there are auto-graded analytics exercises. Not to mention, students have access to the eBook and study tools geared toward their own personal knowledge gaps (based on their interactions with the adaptive learning of SmartBook). This is a great display of content meshed well with technology.

4. Ethical and Global Elements
As opposed to devoting one chapter to Ethics and Globalization, they are woven through the text as a section in each chapter. Students are presented with cases that relate to the chapter topics. which helps give them a more robust view of marketing.

5. Social Media Application
Again, this was a key feature of the text for me. While they offer a chapter on Digital/ Social Media Marketing, there is also the opportunity for student to explore application within a Social Media Application section in each chapter as it relates to specific chapter topics. This is a great way to relate basic principles of marketing to social media as a tool for marketers.


The Chapter Challenge
How does your undergrad text measure up? You can take The Chapter Challenge here. Why am I suggesting you do this?.. Well, for every Challenge completed, McGraw-Hill will make a donation to the American Marketing Association’s Diversity Leadership and Social Impact scholarships. The Chapter Challenge takes about half an hour to complete and invites you to compare Shane Hunt, John Mello, and George Deitz’s Marketing, 2nd edition with your current Marketing Principles course materials.

Take the Challenge and feel free to comment below!


I don’t often write about my Doctoral Journey…But when I do… it’s no longer sprinkled with four letter words.


chnrdu / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

I don’t often write about my Doctoral Journey…But when I do… it’s no longer sprinkled with four letter words. I may have just found my rhythm, for the moment.

The dissertation process is one that I have become increasingly familiar with in my years as a doctoral student ( I just reached 3 years, 10 months and 22 days). What once was a vague image has become clearer and more relatable. Through my previous coursework, I have learned just how important time management is for someone who is working full time, going to school full time, and trying to maintain a happy family at home. My time management schedule has become routine to me, and should offer some stability when proceeding through the dissertation sequence. I have learned valuable skills related to organization as well. However, I do notice that in my organization, I still have a bit of chaos. When I believe I have my research organized by themes, I discover a new connection or find that what was once thought to be connected may indeed not be.

Self Help
Two obstacles I must overcome through this arduous process is managing family time, and remaining organized through the accumulation of additional research. Since last spring, I have been reading a few books dedicated to doctoral student success in preparation for the dissertation phase. Three books I have found to be quite helpful are Dissertations and Theses from Start to Finish, Finish your Dissertation Once and For All, and The Smart Way to Your Ph.D.

With this assortment of books, I was able to see inside the time-frame and structure of a dissertation, common pain points for each section, coping techniques for one of the most stressful endeavors a person will go through, and practical personal and writing advice from those who have been through the process. Through these readings, I have found both support and motivation in what used to be one of the most daunting periods of my doctoral journey. I no longer feel as isolated as I once did. The authors of Finish your Dissertation Once and for All: How to overcome psychological barriers, get results, and move on with your life by Alison Miller and The Smart Way to Your Ph.D.: 200 secrets from 100 graduates by Dora Farkas ( @DoraFarkasPhD) made me feel as though I was working with my own dissertation coaches. Social media has also been instrumental to me as I gain momentum for the dissertation. I follow a few blogs written by students further ahead of me in the process, their experiences have helped me prepare and stay motivated. I also have joined a few online support groups and have made a few ‘friends’ on Twitter; I now know I am not alone in the journey.

The Unknown
One extraneous pain point I have not been able to address is dealing with my committee, as I have not been assigned one yet. This is an unknown hurdle that I look forward to checking off my list. I feel that if I can get the Concept Paper written and approved in the first dissertation sequence, the timeline I have established for myself will be attainable. I have worked hard to do as much research and writing before the dissertation phase specifically for that reason. I want to have as much feedback from course mentors as possible on as many section of the Concept Paper as possible. Acceptance of the CP on the first submission is a primary goal.

In preparation for this new phase of my journey, I have gathered some reading material to help guide, motivate, and prepare me in some areas I feel I can use some additional help. How to Prepare a Dissertation Proposal by David Krathwol and Nick Smith is a highly recommended book that should offer the guidance I need to ensure timely acceptance of my Concept Paper and Dissertation Proposal. I find I struggle a bit in my critical thinking and evaluations of research, so I have two books I hope will help me hone these skills: Critical Thinking About Research by Julian Meltzoff and The Craft of Research by Wayne Booth, Gregory Colomb, and Joseph Williams. I plan to read these three books before and during my Comprehensive Exam phase.

Learning is the process, not the product
Of course, all plans are subject to change; I know I need to be flexible and stay motivated regardless of outcomes. There will be times I may get discouraged with committee feedback, but all of their wisdom only makes my dissertation better. I also need to bear in mind that the dissertation is likely the worst research and writing I will ever do in my academic career, it will only get better after each ensuing writing project. With each course I have taken, I am one step closer to completion. Similarly, with each week of the dissertation process, I am closer to achieving the loftiest goal I have ever set for myself. Ultimately culminating with a Ph.D., an achievement I will be unreservedly proud of.

Next stop, Comprehensive exam and ‘dissertating’

photo


Recommended movies for Marketing Students

medium_4683421549 I usually share a list of movies with my undergrads to get them pumped up about Marketing and to see how it infiltrates our everyday lives. Hopefully those of you who are students past and present, undergrad and graduate will enjoy these hand picked Marketing flicks! Those who are not students, but Marketing geeks like me: enjoy! I must warn you that may get a little resistance from non-marketing family members if you tell them these are Marketing related (as I did with my husband). But, I assure you they will enjoy them!

The following are some great movies to request on Netflix, Blockbuster, HULU, or whatever you like (in no particular order):

For trailers of the movies visit My TAMU page on my blog here.

Chef
2014 Jon Favreau, Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson
A chef who loses his restaurant job starts up a food truck in an effort to reclaim his creative promise, while piecing back together his estranged family. Great for those who love Social Media Marketing.

Syrup
2013 Amber Heard and Shiloh Fernandez (Note this is Rated R)
A slacker hatches a million-dollar idea. But, in order to see it through, he has to learn to trust his attractive corporate counterpart. This covers branding, image, and perception.

Guilt Trip
2012 Barbra Streisand, Seth Rogen, Julene Renee
As inventor Andy Brewster is about to embark on the road trip of a lifetime, a quick stop at his mom’s house turns into an unexpected cross-country voyage with her along for the ride. Fantastic movie on getting your product to market, and funny!

The Greatest Movie Ever Sold
2011 Morgan Spurlock
Very informational, funny, and gives great insight into branding. My favorite!

The Joneses
2009 Demi Moore and David Duchovny
Great example of how we influence each other and how marketers can and do manipulate consumer behavior.

Idiocracy
2006 Luke Wilson, Maya Rudolph and Dax Shepard
Not a movie that requires your undivided attention, but I enjoy seeing brand sponsorships for everything and placed everywhere!

Minority Report
2002 Tom Cruise, Colin Farrell and Samantha Morton
I enjoyed seeing a glimpse into the future in this movie. Keep in mind this was 10 years ago. Pay attention to the personalized marketing messages on billboards.

Boiler Room
2000 Giovanni Ribisi, Vin Diesel, Ben Affleck and Nia Long
Token FBI/ethics/fraud movie.

The Husdsucker Proxy
1994 Tim Robbins, Paul Newman and Jennifer Jason Leigh
A rather comical look (a Coen brothers movie) at running a manufacturing plant. Free on Amazon Prime.

Glengarry Glen Ross
1992 Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon and Alec Baldwin
A movie about desperate real estate agents. Free on Amazon Prime. Available on Netflix streaming.

Tucker: A Man and his Dream
1988 Jeff Bridges, Joan Allen, Martin Landau and Christian Slater
Great movie on a man, his product, and going to market. Free on Amazon Prime.

What other movies should be added to this list!? I am always looking for more movies to watch and share with students related to all facets of Marketing (and business)… Please share!

photo credit: Pink Sherbet Photography via photopin cc


How To Use LinkedIn To Stand Out Among the Crowd: Professional Social Network Hacks That Work

medium_3555228460
According to a recent Mashable article, 37 percent of surveyed job recruiters identify social (professional) networks as one of the most important sources for hiring. Additionally, 90 of the Fortune 100 companies use LinkedIn’s corporate talent solutions to find future hires. Whether you are about to graduate, just started classes, or are somewhere in between: you must seriously consider utilizing LinkedIn as a career tool!

I often have undergrads asking what the difference is between LinkedIn and Facebook, as they see it as ‘just another social network.’ That notion could not be further from the truth. Facebook is more about establishing personal relationships, while LinkedIn is more about conducting business.

Profile Basics

As you enter your profile details, do not think of your LinkedIn profile as an online resume, it goes beyond that. LinkedIn allows you to create a profile that can showcase projects you have worked on that relate to your career and goals. It also allows you to use keywords that align with what you currently do, what you have done in the past, and what you ultimately want to do in the future. Thus making you “findable.”

You can visually illustrate your skills with rich media, such as pictures, video, projects, or even a presentation you’re especially proud of. Include these if they are professional and relate to your overall goals and career aspirations. Help recruiters visualize what type of talent you bring to the table.

As you set up your profile, know you can come back and add to it and tweak it as well. Remember:

1. Post a photo! Use a professional headshot if possible.
2. Professional presentation is important on LinkedIn, but do not omit all of your personality. LinkedIn is a social network- creating personal connections is important. Also important is engagement and relevancy.
3. Consider your goals. Think long and hard on this as these goals will shape how you create and maintain your profile. LinkedIn offers some suggestions here. Are you looking for a job, are you creating a personal brand, are you making connections now for when you graduate and/or change careers?

By now I hope you see the importance of a LinkedIn profile. Take a moment to click on the hyperlinks within this post and bookmark them for later reading. A great article to start with from U.S. News that outlines some great tips can be found here.

Groups and Connecting with Thought Leaders

Not only does LinkedIn allow you to post your own profile, you can view others and connect. Unlike Facebook, connecting with folks you do not actually know is not seen as ‘creepy.’ It is a great personal branding tool for students to post relevant information, a photo, and interests, as well as connect with those in their industry. In addition, LinkedIn offers many groups that are industry specific that can be used as a sounding board, for advice and even support. For example, you may be interested in the SNHU Alumni Group or the Graphic Design Group. Search LinkedIn for your particular industry.

LinkedIn groups are a great way to engage directly with others in your industry and establish yourself as an active contributor rather than a passive spectator. Mashable suggests one of the best ways to get noticed is to participate in conversations and ask smart questions. Be professional and do a bit of research (or at the very least a Google search) before you ask a question.

Connect with your friends, current and past co-workers, professors and industry leaders; always remember you are judged by the company you keep!

Recommendations and Endorsements

A recommendation from someone in your desired field speaks volumes to your ability to stand out from the crowd. Seek recommendations from those who have a good sense of your work ethic and accomplishments. Those you ask for a recommendation will have to write a bit, so keep that in mind. Alternatively, an ‘endorsement’ is achievable with a simple click. Note it is common practice to reciprocate an ‘endorsement.’

Research

Always check out the pages of your targeted employers, or those you will interview with. By visiting company pages, you can conduct valuable research on the business, its policies and more. This kind of company research on LinkedIn can help keep you ahead of your competition. You may also discover an internship in your research. Several companies list these wonderful opportunities on LinkedIn.

Get Started: Focus on the value you bring to a potential employer.

The Huffington Post suggests that having a LinkedIn profile in an age of technology is absolutely crucial for college students. Utilize these (free) tools LinkedIn provides to brand yourself as the employee the company you want to work for will WANT. It does not happen overnight, but the connections you make will prove to be a great source of support, information and encouragement.

There are multiple tutorials on how to use LinkedIn efficiently for various purposes. Click and save to your bookmarks:

LinkedIn for Students

LinkedIn Guide and Checklist

Again, Be sure to click the hyperlinks within this post! The curated links will assist you in crafting the most effective profile for LinkedIn. Please do not hesitate to connect with me at any of my social touch points!photo credit: Graela via photopin cc


Graduate School is nothing like Undergrad: 5 ways it is more Rewarding

10891456256_0b557c1564

When talking to undergraduate students or even those in the workforce considering going back to school for their Master’s, I am always asked, “How is it different?” It is very different, and in a good way.

I waited close to three years between my bachelor’s and master’s. I chose to graduate with a double major in Business Administration and Marketing, continue working full time and make a dent in my student loans. When I was ready to start the process of applying to graduate school, I found out my employer would not pay for courses in “Marketing” because I was working in a technical department within the telecom industry (with the hopes of a marketing department transfer). Instead of getting a Masters in IT or being deterred, I went ahead and switched jobs and made my preparations for grad school. Looking back, this was a great thing. Not only did I get my Master’s, I avoided massive layoffs, seeing my employer investigated by the SEC and the collapse of one of the largest telecom companies in the United States. Gotta love the ‘90s!

The biggest concern I had about graduate school was the GMAT. I felt I never tested well. Once the test was taken, the results printed, I was on my way to two years of fun. Truly, I loved every minute of it. And here is why:

Level of Maturity
I was 25 and mature enough. By 25, you usually have your personality developed, aspirations in mind, goals set out and a picture for the future — what better time to devote about two years to bettering yourself? I had some professional experience under my belt, which would prove to be useful in my course work, and had a clear idea of what I wanted from my graduate program.

Career in Progress
I was not as concerned about hurrying and finishing my degree so I could get a “better job,” as I was during my undergrad years. I worked part time my freshman and sophomore years, and full time during my junior and senior years. I was so determined to graduate and get a better-paying job that I overloaded each term by taking 21 to 24 semester hours. This time around, I was making better money and was able to pay for each class as I took it. Not to mention, while in school, I could defer my previous student loans.

Industry Specific
Probably the main reason I loved my Master’s program so much was that each course was directly related to my area of interest: Marketing. What’s not to love about Consumer Behavior, Global Marketing, Marketing Managements and Promotions? Graduate courses are focused on topics you may have experience with or will have experience with as you develop your desired career. These courses also make readings, case studies and projects more relevant and applicable. In contrast, my undergraduate courses varied and typically were dealt with subjects I had little interest in until I reached my junior and senior years.

Connections
In my graduate career, I had some great instructors who took an active interest in me. The classes were smaller, and we were able to get to know one another better. Many of these instructors kept in touch after graduation, and ultimately it was one of my grad-school instructors (turned Department Head) who hired me for my first adjunct teaching assignment. These instructors see what you are capable of doing and can be a great source of information and guidance — they can also write killer letters of reference! Similarly, I was able to create friendships with my peers that transcended into valuable professional contacts. Now with social media, it is even easier to stay connected to instructors and peers, and explore networking beyond graduation.

Like-Minded Individuals
Have you ever felt out of place with friends? Most of my friends had very little interest in business in the depth I did. Most had careers in different sectors or were married with children. In grad school, I was surrounded by like-minded folks who shared my respect for education, valued hard work and had the potential to be thought leaders in my field.

I am not saying obtaining a Master’s or an MBA is a piece of cake and one big social party. It is hard work, but when the end result is one you desire and the topic of study is one you love, it really can be enjoyable. And don’t forget: There are plenty of organizations that value an MBA.

Don’t let fear of the unknown stop you from pursuing something so awesome! If someone you know if ‘thinking’ about a Masters/MBA, be sure to share this post with them.


Social Media as a tool for educators and students

medium_8540717756

Most college courses incorporate some form of social media into learning material (I have been known to go a little Social Media crazy), so most students are familiar with basic uses of the medium. Considering most students are already using such platforms as Facebook and YouTube, it only makes sense to utilize these tools for education. Students are using social media to view supplemental information pertaining to their courses via blogs, wikis, forums, YouTube and more. For example, Stanford Graduate School of Business has a YouTube channel that offers viewers lectures, interviews, and an insight into many of its graduate level courses. Similarly, blogs (such as this one) are introduced to students to offer additional resources for review in order to achieve an over all goal of comprehending course topics. Social offers various ways to present material. One of the most common and widely-used categorizations of the various types of learning styles is Fleming’s VARK model (sometimes VAK) which lists learners as:

1. visual learners: info-graphics, pictures, diagrams, video presentations.
2. auditory learners: lectures, discussions, podcasts, online videos.
3. kinesthetic learners or tactile learners: Physically “doing”.

Using social media can assist instructors in universities in catering to these needs.

Networking capabilities alone make the use of platforms such as LinkedIn and Twitter a must for university students. Social allows the users (students for the sake of this discussion) to not only forge relationships with others in their field of study, but it also enhances the educational experience. Platforms such as discussion boards, Facebook, and individual blogs help to foster a feeling of community for those taking online/distance education courses (as well as those taking courses on campus). For example, I have a Facebook group for my present and past students. Via the page, students can network with each other, I post employment opportunities and Marketing related materials, and the students do the same. Students from both universities (thousands of miles away from each other) are utilizing this page. In addition, I use Twitter in the same fashion. Further, all of my level one students (those taking class one of three) have personal blogs as a requirement of the course. They ‘follow’ each other via Twitter and their blogs and give support and critique when needed.

I believe there is less emphasis on social for employment searches, career advancement, and personal branding than I would like to see in undergraduate courses. For example, the use of a LinkedIn profile and the groups found within could be utilized for job searches, industry specific news, networking with those in your field, or perhaps following an organization you hope to work for. A personal blog can highlight a student portfolio, and a Twitter feed may further enhance the students’ brand. Personal branding through social can help a student position themselves for success. Every undergraduate student should be able to utilize social in the following ways:

1. Networking
2. Researching
3. Job Searching
4. Personal Branding

Social Media as introduced in graduate courses go beyond the above mentioned basic use of social media platforms. (See my last article). The series of courses is introduced with the first week centered around students learning about the evolution of social media and comparison of the various social media tools. Often students do not realize how often they are using social media because they have never actually defined social media beyond Facebook, MySpace, or Twitter. Similarly, they may have never considered the business uses for social media or their benefits to consumers and businesses. Always an interesting topic for discussion for the first week of this first course is the state of current business practices using social media. It is a great way to get the students realizing what social media marketing is, and what it is not.

I am always surprised that one or two students each term questions if they ‘have’ to get a Twitter account and create a blog for the course. The answer is yes. Anyone wanting to learn about social media needs to be “in” social. I always look forward to seeing my students create their blogs. They have addressed various topics and I truly love watching them get creative with the design, layout, topics, and promotion of the blogs. Many of them choose to keep the blog private for only the class and myself to view, and that is completely acceptable. My main concern is having the student experience the creation and maintenance of a blog and understand the role it has within business.

Read the entire article on Maximizesocialbusiness.com

photo credit: mkhmarketing via photopin cc


Social Media as a tool for Educators, Students AND Business

the tartanpodcast / Foter.com / CC BY-NC

Throughout this article, I will be speaking strictly from my experience as to how social media is introduced in universities as an adjunct faculty member within Marketing and Management departments. Therefore, I am not referring to other disciplines or courses other than my own.

Social Media as a tool for educators:

Most college courses incorporate some form of social media into learning material, so most students are familiar with basic uses of the medium. Considering most students are already using such platforms as Facebook and YouTube, it only makes sense to utilize these tools for education. Students are using social media to view supplemental information pertaining to their courses via blogs, wikis, forums, YouTube and more. For example, Stanford Graduate School of Business has a YouTube channel that offers viewers lectures, interviews, and an insight into many of its graduate level courses. Similarly, blogs are introduced to students to offer additional resources for review in order to achieve an over all goal of comprehending course topics. Social offers various ways to present material. One of the most common and widely-used categorizations of the various types of learning styles is Fleming’s VARK model (sometimes VAK) which lists learners as:

1. visual learners: info-graphics, pictures, diagrams, video presentations.
2. auditory learners: lectures, discussions, podcasts, online videos.
3. kinesthetic learners or tactile learners: Physically “doing”.

Using social media can assist instructors in universities in catering to these needs.

Social Media as a tool for students:

Networking capabilities alone make the use of platforms such as LinkedIn and Twitter a must for university students. Social allows the users (students for the sake of this discussion) to not only forge relationships with others in their field of study, but it also enhances the educational experience. Platforms such as discussion boards, Facebook, and individual blogs help to foster a feeling of community for those taking online/distance education courses (as well as those taking courses on campus). For example, I have a Facebook group for my present and past students. Via the page, students can network with each other, I post employment opportunities and Marketing related materials, and the students do the same. Students from both universities (thousands of miles away from each other) are utilizing this page. In addition, I use Twitter in the same fashion. Further, all of my level one students (those taking class one of three) have personal blogs as a requirement of the course. They ‘follow’ each other via Twitter and their blogs and give support and critique when needed.

I believe there is less emphasis on social for employment searches, career advancement, and personal branding than I would like to see in undergraduate courses. For example, the use of a LinkedIn profile and the groups found within could be utilized for job searches, industry specific news, networking with those in your field, or perhaps following an organization you hope to work for. A personal blog can highlight a student portfolio, and a Twitter feed may further enhance the students’ brand. Personal branding through social can help a student position themselves for success. Every undergraduate student should be able to utilize social in the following ways:

1. Networking
2. Researching
3. Job Searching
4. Personal Branding

Social media as a tool for business:

The Social Media as introduced in graduate courses go beyond the above mentioned basic use of social media platforms. (See my last article). The series of courses is introduced with the first week centered around students learning about the evolution of social media and comparison of the various social media tools. Often students do not realize how often they are using social media because they have never actually defined social media beyond Facebook, MySpace, or Twitter. Similarly, they may have never considered the business uses for social media or their benefits to consumers and businesses. Read the entire article on WindmillNetworking.

Photo credit: the tartanpodcast / Foter.com / CC BY-NC


What is the point of Social Media Marketing Classes in College?

velkr0 / Foter.com / CC BY

As social networks and their potential value to business are becoming apparent, marketing professionals should have a solid knowledge of social media and more importantly social media marketing. Simply having a grasp on how to post on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube or another platform is not sufficient. Marketing professionals need to understand how to integrate social into marketing strategies.

The term “Social Media” should not be confused with “Social Media Marketing”, there is a distinction to be made between the two. Social media is an evolving and changing assortment of platforms and tools that enable businesses and consumers to share dialogue, information, and interact on a one-to-one basis or on a one-to-many basis. Understanding how to combine the traditional principles of marketing with the use of a “tool” (such as Twitter, Google+, or a company blog) to meet an organizations objectives and goals is social media marketing.
It is unfortunate that many business schools are not recognizing the potential of new technology by offering courses in social marketing. Addressing it as a whole in one week of a semester is not sufficient. Briefly covering the leading sites, how many users sign on daily, how they are used by the typical user, and when each site was created does little to educate students on the significant part social media plays in business. While these facts are interesting and some of the numbers downright staggering, they do not benefit the student long term. Meaning, the brief overview of social does little to encourage the use of social media for more than keeping in touch with friends.

Offerings should include entire courses designed to not simply teach students to use social media, but to create it. Students should learn to use social marketing techniques to conduct market research and create more effective campaigns, improve products, and generate leads. Students must be able to understand people’s behavior in social media to better target audiences as well as know how social media relates to inbound marketing. Not to mention the benefits of blogging and of course the importance of SEO (search engine optimization). University students should at the very least have the opportunity to develop a tailored social media marketing strategy for their own personal brand to further enhance their attractiveness to future employers. Those universities not offering such courses are doing a disservice to both their students and the students’ future employers.

Alas, not all is lost! Do not fret, there are a few universities who have taken the initiative to offer social media programs! For example…
Read the entire article on Windmill Networking.

Photo credit: velkr0 / Foter.com / CC BY


Geek out over the holidays watching Marketing movies? Absolutely!

medium_4683421549 I usually share a list of movies with my undergrads to get them pumped up about Marketing and to see how it infiltrates our everyday lives. Hopefully those of you who are students past and present, undergrad and graduate will enjoy your winter break while catching up on some great Marketing flicks! Those who are not students, but Marketing geeks like me: enjoy! I must warn you that may get a little resistance from non-marketing family members if you tell them these are Marketing related (as I did with my husband). But, I assure you they will enjoy them!

The following are some great movies to request on Netflix, Blockbuster, HULU, or whatever you like (in no particular order):

For trailers of the movies visit My TAMU page on my blog here.

Chef
2014 Jon Favreau, Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson
A chef who loses his restaurant job starts up a food truck in an effort to reclaim his creative promise, while piecing back together his estranged family. Great for those who love Social Media Marketing.

Guilt Trip
2012 Barbra Streisand, Seth Rogen, Julene Renee
As inventor Andy Brewster is about to embark on the road trip of a lifetime, a quick stop at his mom’s house turns into an unexpected cross-country voyage with her along for the ride. Fantastic movie on getting your product to market, and funny!

Syrup
2013 Amber Heard and Shiloh Fernandez (Note this is Rated R)
A slacker hatches a million-dollar idea. But, in order to see it through, he has to learn to trust his attractive corporate counterpart. This covers branding, image, and perception.

The Greatest Movie Ever Sold
2011 Morgan Spurlock
Very informational, funny, and gives great insight into branding. My favorite!

The Joneses
2009 Demi Moore and David Duchovny
Great example of how we influence each other and how marketers can and do manipulate consumer behavior.

Idiocracy
2006 Luke Wilson, Maya Rudolph and Dax Shepard
Not a movie that requires your undivided attention, but I enjoy seeing brand sponsorships for everything and placed everywhere!

Minority Report
2002 Tom Cruise, Colin Farrell and Samantha Morton
I enjoyed seeing a glimpse into the future in this movie. Keep in mind this was 10 years ago. Pay attention to the personalized marketing messages on billboards.

Boiler Room
2000 Giovanni Ribisi, Vin Diesel, Ben Affleck and Nia Long
Token FBI/ethics/fraud movie.

The Husdsucker Proxy
1994 Tim Robbins, Paul Newman and Jennifer Jason Leigh
A rather comical look (a Coen brothers movie) at running a manufacturing plant. Free on Amazon Prime.

Glengarry Glen Ross
1992 Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon and Alec Baldwin
A movie about desperate real estate agents. Free on Amazon Prime. Available on Netflix streaming.

Tucker: A Man and his Dream
1988 Jeff Bridges, Joan Allen, Martin Landau and Christian Slater
Great movie on a man, his product, and going to market. Free on Amazon Prime.

What other movies should be added to this list!? I am always looking for more movies to watch and share with students related to all facets of Marketing (and business)… Please share!

photo credit: Pink Sherbet Photography via photopin cc


Social Media Books for Continued Learning & Keeping that SMM Spark Alive!

Last updated 1/2015

Well, another term of teaching Social Media Marketing courses is coming to a close and a new Fall term is beginning. I am proud of my students, all 3 of the courses delve into various topics, require a lot of reading, application, and writing. Let me re-phrase that, scholarly writing! (My students will chuckle at that)– I will see some of the students in my MKT655 again shortly in MKT666, and I look forward to it! Watching their progress (and Klout scores rise) is very satisfying. As I send off graduate students in my final course MKT666 (course 3 of 3), I wanted to remind them to keep on learning about this ever changing landscape.

I want to share with you the list of books I recommend to students and non-students alike.These books will help my students to continue their learning and to keep them energized about social media marketing! This list is not exhaustive of course, there are many other books out there that are worthy of mentions. However, these are books that I enjoyed that resonated with me and I hope you will enjoy them too.

*Maximizing LinkedIn for Sales and Social Media Marketing: An Unofficial, Practical Guide to Selling & Developing B2B Business on LinkedIn by Neal Schaffer

*Maximize your Social by Neal Schaffer

*8 Mandates for Social Media Marketing Success by Kent Huffman

* The Tao of Twitter by Mark Schaefer

* Social Media Explained by Mark Schaefer

* Return on Influence by Mark Schaefer

* Born to Blog by Mark Schaefer

Dr J, Mark Schaefer, and Kent Huffman 1/2013

Dr J, Mark Schaefer, and Kent Huffman 1/2013

*Likeable Social Media: How to Delight Your Customers, Create an Irresistible Brand, and Be Generally Amazing on Facebook (And Other Social Networks) by Dave Kerpen

* WTF: What’s the Future of Business by Brian Solis

*Engage! by Brian Solis.

* Socialnomics by Erik Qualman

*No Bullshit Social Media: The All-Business, No-Hype Guide to Social Media Marketing by Erik Deckers

*The NOW Revolution: 7 Shifts to Make Your Business Faster, Smarter and More Social
by Jay Baer and Amber Naslund

*Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions by Guy Kawasaki

*The Thank You Economy by Gary Vaynerchuk

*Crush It! by Gary Vaynerchuk

*The End of Business As Usual: Rewire the Way You Work to Succeed in the Consumer Revolution by Brian Solis

*The Social Customer: How Brands Can Use Social CRM to Acquire, Monetize, and Retain Fans, Friends, and Followers by Adam Metz

*HeadStrong: The Keys To A Confident And Positive Attitude During Job Search by Tim Tyrell-Smith

*The Social Media Sales Revolution: The New Rules for Finding Customers, Building Relationships, and Closing More Sales Through Online Networking by Landy Chase and Kevin Knebl

*Groundswell: Winning in a World Transformed by Social Technologies by Charlene Li and Josh Bernoff

*Google+ for Business: How Google’s Social Network Changes Everything by Chris Brogan

*Perspectives on Social Media Marketing by Bonin Bough and Stephanie Agresta

*Social Media ROI: Managing and Measuring Social Media Efforts in Your Organization by Olivier Blanchard

*Content Rules: How to Create Killer Blogs, Podcasts, Videos, Ebooks, Webinars (and More) That Engage Customers and Ignite Your Business
by Ann Handley and CC Chapman

*The New Rules of Marketing & PR: by David Meerman Scott

In my social media course I try to connect my students with some of the above thought leaders. Past terms have visited with Mark Schaefer (Summer 2012), Neal Schaffer (Fall 2012).

Update: Another great list of Social Media Books here!

photo credit: Ed Yourdon via photo pin cc


%d bloggers like this: